Clownfish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 Otjikoto Lake

Namibia

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (2)

Latitude: 19° 11.673' S
Longitude: 17° 33.011' E

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 Access

How? From shore

Distance Short walk from shore (< 5min)

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Average depth 45 m / 147.6 ft

Max depth 58 m / 190.3 ft

Current None

Visibility Medium ( 5 - 10 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Great

Experience Kamikazes/Trimix

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Fresh water
- Wall
- Deep
- Cave
- Ambiance

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Night dive
- Dive training
- Snorkeling / Free diving
- Photography

Dangers

- Depth
- Explosives

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

English (Translate this text in English): Otjikoto Lake is a the smaller of only two natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave, located 20 km outside of Tsumeb, a few meters from the main road B1.

The lake was a dumping ground for German troops during World War I; German troops dumped war materials in the lake to stop the South African and British troops from using them. Most of the materials have been recovered and are displayed in Tsumeb Museum.

Tilapia guinasana, a mouth-breeding species of fish which naturally was only found in Otjikoto's sister lake, Lake Guinas, was introduced to Otjikoto Lake. The claim that lake Guinas is indeed connected to lake Otjikoto by underground caves is frequently made but not proven as yet. Source: Wikipedia.org

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