Clownfish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 Solomon reef

Dominica

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (1)

Latitude: 15° 16.334' N
Longitude: 61° 22.455' W

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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

English (Translate this text in English): Boat and shore

How? By boat & from shore

Distance Instant access

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Solomon reef

Average depth 5 m / 16.4 ft

Max depth 21 m / 68.9 ft

Current Low ( < 1 knot)

Visibility Medium ( 5 - 10 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Good

Experience All divers

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Reef

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Children dive
- Night dive
- First dive
- Dive training
- Snorkeling / Free diving
- Orientation
- Photography

Dangers

- Boat trafic

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

“Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

English (Translate this text in English): “Solomon” a volcanic formation with it’s large granite type reef just a few feet off-shore where you can snorkel and or scuba dive.

The site is named after a judge in the 40’s who was killed from a landslide while travelling along the coastal road from Point Michelle to Loubiere. He apparently was not very popular with some of the locals who rejoiced by making up a folk song which is still sung today. The area is made up of “tarish” (compressed ash and debris) from a pyroclastic eruption of the nearby dormant volcano. Solomon tarish has always been mined for building material and is still used today.

The site which technically is outside the marine reserve is a valuable area for turtles, subsistence fishing activities, scuba diving, snorkeling and, is still closely monitored by the Fisheries Division. It has been described on good days as snorkeling in an aquarium.

This site is a fantastic dive/snorkel site starting at a depth of 3 feet and dropping down to 80 feet.

The reef is in good condition with huge volcanic rock formations composed of isolated patch reef coral, sponge encrusted rocks and brilliant coral growth that rise up from the sandy floor. It creates a habitat and is teeming with many juvenile and adult tropical fish mainly of the grunt and parrotfish families, other fish present are creole wrasse, the ubiquitous brown chromis, black bar soldier fish, squirrel fish, trumpet fish, porcupine fish, puffer fish, and abundance invertebrate like pederson shrimp; arrow crabs, sea cucumbers, banded coral shrimp and squid. The reef is cloaked in sponges, anemones and crinoids. Several eels are also seen there indicating a healthy population of carnivores at this site. Experience the combination of hard and soft coral that is an example of the incredible ecosystem that is yours to discover. The largest percentage of living cover was that of hard coral, primarily varieties of brain coral, maze coral and star corals. Sponges formed the next percentile of living cover; both sponges and corals provide shelter for juvenile species and form the backbone of a healthy reef system. Soft coral in the form of sea rods, sea whips and sea plumes are also preseent.

Expect to be treated with a real sense of discovery because the area is currently not being visited (yet) by the other operators.
We also monitor the tour from our base-station and can respond within minutes if needed.

Don’t forget your swimsuit, towel and sunscreen.

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