Big eye, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

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 Makaha Caverns

USA, Hawaii, Oahu

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Datum: WGS84 [ Help ]
Precision: Approximate

GPS History (2)

Latitude: 21° 28.503' N
Longitude: 158° 13.505' W

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 Access

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns can be accessed by the Farrington Highway on the W Shore. Parking off the main road, close to the lifeguard stand.

How? By boat & from shore

Distance Instant access

Easy to find? Easy to find

 Dive site Characteristics

Alternative name Makaha Beach Park

Average depth 8.0 m / 26.2 ft

Max depth 10.0 m / 32.8 ft

Current Low ( < 1 knot)

Visibility Good ( 10 - 30 m)

Quality

Dive site quality Good

Experience CMAS * / OW

Bio interest Interesting

More details

Week crowd 

Week-end crowd 

Dive type

- Cave
- Sharks
- Reef

Dive site activities

- Marine biology
- Dive training
- Photography

Dangers

 Additional Information

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

English (Translate this text in English): Makaha Caverns are usually accessed by boat, but you can swim by the beach (about 150 yards).

Shore diving is a serious surface swim, if there are surfers present then I would advise against the dive. Following the reef line from the shore there will be a mooring buoy and just in on the reef from there is a large cleaning station which can hold up to 6 turtles. The caverns are at the end of the reef as mentioned about 150 yards out. There is also a mooring buoy from there shoot back toward shore and you should run across the caverns. The caverns are spacious and you can see without a light, though a light is clearly recommended on any dive. Dive flags are mandatory, people have been fined for not using one and the lifeguards will often stop you before you enter. Do not leave any valuables in your car, animosity towards military and tourists runs high in the area as does vehicle break ins.

 Photos

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Makaha Caverns
United States of America

Makaha Caverns
United States of America

Makaha Caverns
United States of America

Makaha Caverns
United States of America

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 Dive logs

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Makaha Caverns
By Phat Kev
Nov 29, 1998
Dive 19 - Adv Open Water - Boat Dive First time with U/W photography, cheap little disposable camera. 7 congor eels in one whole, white mouth eel, many fish, spiny sea urchin, dive buddy and myself.  The pics did not turn out very well, most
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Makaha Caverns
By Phat Kev
Nov 28, 1998
Dive 16 - Adv Open Water - Navigation Dive A few green sea turtles, many fish and sea urchins.
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Makaha Caverns
By Phat Kev
Nov 28, 1998
Dive 17 - Adv Open Water - Night Dive Many green sea turtles, a moray eel and many bugs (spiny lobster).
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 Comments

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By Jack Remus , 17-04-2009

Awesome beach dive - Great palce to to a off shore beach entry snorkel dive, lots of fish and green turtles and only have to swim out maybe 50 yards to start seeing them. uiwmpalce

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